• July 24, 2014

Haiti Earthquake Relief: How Much Charities Have Raised and Spent

ActionAid USA
Washington
Amount raised: $502,000; $12,900,000 worldwide
Amount spent: $5,200,000 worldwide
Where the money went: Emergency relief, including food for more than 54,000 people, hygiene kits, and more than 11,000 tarps; 1,500 school kits; cash-for-work programs employing more than 3,400 people; seed distribution and grinding mills to bolster rural areas of Haiti; mental-health programs reaching more than 27,000 people; and a cholera-prevention campaign that included the distribution of 10,000 kits that contain soap, hand sanitizer, bleach, buckets, water-purification tablets, and oral-rehydration salts.
Future plans: Over the next two years, programs will focus on food security and supporting rural areas,transitional housing, disaster-risk reduction, school construction, and advocacy.

Adventist Development and Relief Agency International
Silver Spring, Md.
Amount raised: $8,845,955
Amount spent: $3,413,127
Government grants: $4,730,882
Where the money went: Food and water distribution, hygiene and sanitation in camps for displaced Haitians, three mobile health-care clinics, an immunization campaign, tents for residents and for classrooms, water purification, and household items.
Future plans: The charity is in the process of constructing 2,500 transitional shelters and establishing the groundwork for long-term development.

American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee
New York
Amount raised: $7,700,000
Amount spent: $5,390,000
Where the money went: Much of the money raised has been distributed to other charities. The group spent more than $1.3-million to help ProDev, a Haitian charity, distribute emergency water tanks, offer temporary schools to people in camps, and construct a new school. It gave $540,000 to help Magen David Adom, an Israeli group, and the Haitian Red Cross reconstruct a hospital rehabilitation unit and provide care and prostheses to patients. Other grants included: $480,000 to Partners in Health, for five ambulances and other assistance; $402,000 for Heart to Heart International, to help mobile and regular clinics; $377,045 to the Afya Foundation, for emergency shelter, medical equipment, and medical care; and $329,596 to train people in building affordable, earthquake-resistant housing. The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee estimates that the programs it has supported have helped more than 240,000 Haitians.
Future plans: The charity expects to spend the remaining money over the next two years on projects done in partnership with local charities and on emergencies such as the cholera outbreak.

American Jewish World Service
New York
Amount raised: $6,500,000
Amount spent: $1,400,000
Where the money went: All but 5 percent (which went to administrative costs) has gone to other organizations, most of which are local Haitian groups. Seventeen groups have so far received grants, including Brac USA, which is using $431,000 to establish a medical center for amputees or others who suffered debilitating injuries;  Movimiento Social-Cultural de los Trabajadores, which received four grants totaling $115,000 to respond to the cholera outbreak, reduce the spread of AIDS by teaching safe-sex practices, and provide immediate health assistance to people affected by the earthquake; and Konbit Pou Ayiti, which got two grants totaling $35,000 to provide health and nutrition for earthquake survivors.
Future plans: Money will be spent over the next three-and-a-half years to strengthen grass-roots groups and support community-development efforts. Grants will also aim to reduce Haiti’s vulnerability to disasters.

American Red Cross
Washington
Amount raised: $479,000,000; $1,046,000,000 worldwide
Amount spent: $245,000,000; $290,000,000 worldwide
In-kind donations: $3,400,000
Where the money went: Most of the money has been distributed to other groups, including $30-million to the United Nations World Food Program, for food; $8.2-million to Fonkoze, for small grants and loans; $7.5-million to Habitat for Humanity International, for transitional shelters; $6.84-million to the International Organization for Migration, for programs to help people earn money; $5.91-million to the U.N. Office for Project Services, for transitional shelters; and to 10 other groups working in the fields of food and emergency services, health, water, livelihoods, cholera care, disaster preparedness, and shelter. The group anticipates that it will have spent or committed $245-million by January 2011.
Future plans: The money will be spent over three to five years. Shelter will get the largest share, but disease prevention, water and sanitation,
disaster preparedness, and grants, loans, and other financial assistance will also receive support.

AmeriCares Foundation
Stamford, Conn.
Amount raised: $15,600,000
Amount spent: $4,000,000
In-kind donations: $40,000,000
Where the money went: $40-million worth of donated medicine and medical supplies distributed to more than 75 health-care facilities and provided to more than 200 volunteer medical teams. Grants totaling $1.1-million went to six health-care organizations, including the Haitian Health Foundation, International Medical Corps, and St. Francois de Sales Hospital.
Future plans: Over the next two to three years, remaining funds will support delivery of donated medicine and medical supplies, training for Haitian medical personnel, the rehabilitation of hospitals and health clinics, and maternal and child health projects.  

Brother's Brother Foundation
Pittsburgh
Amount raised: $950,145
Amount spent: $366,301
In-kind donations: $34,275,000
Where the money went: Shipped 35 containers of medical supplies, food, and other products for distribution by charities including Food for the Poor and Christian Aid Ministries, in addition to sending other supplies to Haiti. Brother’s Brother also helped the Medical Benevolence Foundation, in Houston, demolish and rebuild a water tank for a nursing school in Léogâne, Haiti, and re-granted $150,000 to Haitian Health Foundation for a program that provided food, housing, and medicine.
Future plans: Remaining funds will help Food for the Poor rebuild three schools, which are expected to be completed this spring. It will also pay for two generators for the St. Croix hospital, and for the shipping of building materials and other construction for the hospital. The money will also help support a nursing school in Léogâne.


CARE
Atlanta
Amount raised: $20,000,000; $36,700,000 worldwide
Amount spent: $12,700,000 worldwide
In-kind donations: $4,300,000
Government grants: $980,000
Where the money went: For shelter (41 percent of money raised), including 913 transitional shelters, 414 home-repair kits, and 17,402 shelter-reinforcement kits; water and sanitation (23 percent), including construction and maintenance of 1,027 latrines, 342 showers, and 89 hand-washing stations; food and emergency relief (22 percent); a cash-for-work program for 7,451 people in Léogâne and Bassin; seed distribution; health care; and education.
Future plans: The charity plans to use the money raised by September 30, 2010 within the next two years. Money raised after that will be used over five years. Spending will focus on shelter, water and sanitation, education, economic development, and health.

Catholic Medical Mission Board
New York
Amount raised: $2,555,073
Amount spent: $1,425,239
In-kind donations: $43,975,385
Where the money went: For health care, including the distribution of 481.3 tons of donated medicine and medical supplies, five rural health-care clinics, providing a medical laboratory to University Hospital, and the training of more than 71 community-health workers, four nurses, and five social workers. Support of the Haitian Amputee Coalition, including the production of 5,000 manuals, written in Creole, on how to care for amputated limbs. Therapeutic summer camp for 100 children in Jacmel. Hygiene kits (20,000), meals (500,000), and tents (100) for people affected by the earthquake.
Future plans: The charity will continue to distribute donated medicine and medical supplies and to support the Haiti Amputee Coalition’s three-year plan to improve the ability of the country’s health-care system to provide care to amputees.

Catholic Relief Services
Baltimore
Amount raised: $159,138,977
Amount spent: $27,474,461
In-kind donations: $27,737,122
Government grants: $25,969,529
Where the money went: The money raised from private and government donors provided food to nearly 900,000 people; emergency shelter to more than 215,000 people; helped build more than 1,200 transitional shelters; provided nearly 1,000 emergency medical procedures and conducted more than 64,000 outpatient consultations; installed over 600 latrines, water tanks, and other water facilities; registered 339 children who were separated from their families and provided them support; helped 10,000 people through cash-for-work programs; provided 6,000 vouchers for seeds and fertilizers; handed out soap to more than 22,000 families amid the cholera outbreak; treated cholera patients; and provided more than $1-million to small charities.  Approximately $80-million of the amount raised by the charity was collected directly by churches, 40 percent of which is designated for the reconstruction of church property, so is not available for Catholic Relief Services’ relief work.
Future plans: Catholic Relief Services plans to spend the remaining money over five years on relief and longer-term reconstruction efforts in areas such as shelter, health, water and sanitation, agriculture and livelihoods, education, and security.

ChildFund International
Richmond, Va.
Amount raised: $1,328,223; $175,837 worldwide
Amount spent: $619,741
Where the money went: The group has worked with Christian Blind Mission International to set up safe spaces for children, train child counselors, and support summer programs in art and music therapy.
Future plans: The charity is working with local organizations in Haiti to determine how to spend the remaining money.

Church World Service
New York
Amount raised: $4,883,731
Amount spent: $2,126,469
In-kind donations: $594,202
Where the money went: Worked with grass-roots Haitian groups on a six-month program that provided financial assistance and health care to 600 people with disabilities; repair of 30 homes for clients with disabilities; purchase and expansion of a building to replace the House of Hope children's school and vocational training center; hot lunches for 267 children; financial assistance to help 13 agricultural cooperatives in Northwest Haiti expand to accommodate an influx of evacuees from Port-au-Prince; and logistics support. Hired a paralegal in the United States to help Haitians in the U.S. apply for Temporary Protection Status.
Future plans: Over the next year, the charity will continue to focus on assisting people with disabilities, on education and vocational training in Port-au-Prince, and on food security in northwest Haiti.

Clinton Bush Haiti Fund
Little Rock, Ark.
Amount raised: $52,600,000
Amount spent: $19,600,000
Where the money went: Grants that promote economic development and job creation, health care, and emergency relief.
Future plans: The fund plans to continue to make grants that promote economic opportunity and job creation. 

Concern Worldwide U.S.
New York
Amount raised: $4,784,732
Amount spent: $4,784,732
Government grants: $2,447,968
Where the money went: A camp for Haitians who lost their homes (serving 58,000 people), shelter and other supplies (serving 95,450 people), food (for 95,447 people), clean water (for 75,000 people), and cash-for-work programs (employing 26,423 people).
Future plans: All of the money raised so far has been spent. The charity plans to continue to raise money in 2011 for water and sanitation ($628,000), food ($200,000), and education ($250,000).

Cooperative Housing Foundation International
Silver Spring, Md.
Amount raised: $1,884,000
Amount spent: $942,000
In-kind donations: $4,000,000
Government grants: $41,000,000
Where the money went: The group has spent half its money from private donors to build 400 transitional shelters and to provide water and sanitation in camps for earthquake survivors. Some of that money was also re-granted to the Heartland Alliance for Human Needs and Human Rights, in Chicago. The rest of the money was received in October from the Bush-Clinton Haiti Fund, and is being used to rebuild the State University of Haiti’s science facility.
Future plans: The group plans to complete the science facility by September 2011.

Cross International Alliance
Pompano Beach, Fla.
Amount raised: $5,469,044
Amount spent: $1,535,303
In-kind donations: $71,591,565
Where the money went: Shipping of donated relief supplies valued at more than $71-million ($787,415), management and fund raising ($517,463), cash grants ($182,425), and food ($48,000). In addition, the organization has pledged more than $2-million to housing and school construction, debris removal, and starting a factory to make home-construction materials.
Future Plans: Remaining funds will be spent over four years on shelter and housing, food security and livelihoods, education, human rights, emergency assistance, health, programs to help earthquake survivors heal from trauma, and other costs related to running programs and helping local groups.

Direct Relief International
Santa Barbara, Calif.
Amount raised: $6,552,721
Amount spent: $2,602,765
In-kind donations: $57,216,310
Where the money went: Shipping and delivery of donated medicine and health supplies valued at more than $57-million ($1,403,047); cash grants to grass-roots Haitian organizations ($802,925); program management, travel, and other operating expenses ($226,241); purchase of medicine ($170,552).
Future plans: Rehabilitation and prosthetics services ($1.75-million), transportation, distribution, and storage of medicine, including an online ordering system ($1.5-million); maternal and child health programs ($675,000).

Doctors Without Borders USA (Médecins Sans Frontières USA)
New York
Amount raised: $68,098,228; $135,000,000 worldwide
Amount spent: $70,000,000 worldwide
Where the money went: Through September 30, Doctors Without Borders treated more than 339,000 patients, performed more than 15,700 surgeries and delivered nearly 10,000 babies. The group runs seven free hospitals and supports two Ministry of Health operations in Port-au-Prince, accounting for nearly 1,000 hospital beds in the capital city; the group supports a Ministry of Health hospital in the city of Jacmel; and has been running an emergency hospital in Léogâne, which it replaced with a 120-bed prefabricated hospital in September. The charity  has also established 30 cholera-treatment centers, which had treated more than 41,000 cholera cases as of December 1.
Future plans: Prior to the ongoing cholera outbreak, Doctors Without Borders was budgeted to spend $121 million in Haiti by the end of 2010. Given the current situation, it is likely that all restricted money raised for Haiti will be spent within one year of the earthquake. The organization plans to continue its work at the seven hospitals it currently occupies with the intention of eventually handing the structures over to the Haitian Ministry of Health.

Entertainment Industry Foundation
Los Angeles
Amount raised: $66,000,000
Amount spent: $66,000,000
Where the money went: To support the work in Haiti of the American Red Cross, Clinton Bush Haiti Fund, Friends of the World Food Program, Oxfam, Partners in Health, United States Fund for Unicef, and the Yele Haiti Foundation.

Feed the Children
Oklahoma City
Amount raised: $1,200,000
Amount spent: $1,200,000
In-kind donations: $18,600,000
Where the money went: To manage four camps for people displaced by the earthquake, two of which the charity  continues to manage. The group estimates that it has helped 1,398 families in those camps, an additional 1,673 families in other camps, and provided medical assistance to 13,518 people. It has replaced some of its vehicles that were destroyed in the earthquake and built 869 tents or other temporary shelters at the camps.
Future plans: The money raised for earthquake relief has been spent, but the group will continue to operate in Haiti as it did prior to the disaster.

Fonkoze USA
New York
Amount raised: $2,333,769
Amount spent: $2,333,769
Where the money went: Grants totaling $2,226,380 to Fonkoze Financial Services, in Haiti, to help the microfinance organization rebuild its operations after the earthquake, to help clients rebuild their lives, and to aid employees affected by the disaster. The remaining money was used to increase Fonkoze USA’s operations so the group could respond to the earthquake.
Future plans: Additional contributions will be donated to Fonkoze Financial Services on a monthly basis as they come in.

Food for the Poor
Coconut Creek, Fla.
Amount raised: $20,744,144
Amount spent: $20,744,144
In-kind donations: $159,000,000
Where the money went: Purchase and shipment to Haiti of more than 1,350 containers of food, water, medicine, building supplies, and other materials. The group also constructed 1,500 two-room homes, as well as some emergency sanitation facilities.
Future plans: The money raised after the disaster has been spent, but Food for the Poor will continue to operate in Haiti as it did prior to the earthquake.  

Fuller Center for Housing
Americus, Ga.
Amount raised: $342,977; $351,677 worldwide
Amount spent: $133,255 worldwide
Where the money went: To construct 15 permanent houses and begin construction on five more.
Future plans: To build permanent houses. The group has a goal of building 5,000 over the next five years but will need additional donations.  

Habitat for Humanity International
Americus, Ga.
Amount raised: $16,800,000; $20,500,000 worldwide
Amount spent: $13,000,000 worldwide
In-kind donations: $3,800,000
Government grants: $2,900,000
Where the money went: Building and delivering more than 22,000 emergency shelter kits; assessing 2,000 buildings for structural damage; constructing 918 transitional shelters; constructing or repairing seven permanent houses; expanding the charity’s operations in Haiti; and re-granting some money to other groups.
Future plans: The charity plans to spend the remaining money over the next six to 12 months on shelters, permanent houses, repairs, structural-damage assessments, and training.

Handicap International
Takoma Park, Md.
Amount raised: $516,903; $17,504,700 worldwide
Amount spent: $6,201,300 worldwide
In-kind donations: $978,118
Government grants: $2,600,000
Where the money went: Health care for more than 10,000 people; care and physical rehabilitation for 77,000 people; orthopedic devices and other equipment for 5,000; prostheses for more than 380; orthoses for more than 370; mental-health support for more than 23,000; transport of more than 17,000 tons of water, food, and other supplies; distribution of more than 5,000 tents; employment of more than 4,000 people through cash-for-work programs; and other aid.
Future plans: Money will provide prosthetic and orthotic devices to earthquake victims, training of local staff to take over long-term care of patients, and transitional shelter for vulnerable people.

Heifer International
Little Rock, Ark.
Amount raised: $1,857,794
Amount spent: $1,000,000
In-kind donations: $29,179
Where the money went: Food security, fishing cooperatives, and agriculture programs, including training and seed and livestock distribution.
Future plans: Over the next three years, the organization intends to increase food security and household income of 12,000 families in Haiti through sustainable agriculture, to develop rural economies by improving access to markets and microenterprise, to build the capabilities of local partner organizations, and to repair earthquake-damaged homes.

HelpAge USA
Washington
Amount raised: $1,491,304; $6,745,304 worldwide
Amount spent: $1,400,000; $3,737,414 worldwide
Where the money went: For distribution of food, tents and tarps, hygiene kits, and solar-powered lamps and radios to older Haitians affected by the earthquake; for mobile medical clinics; for transportation to health clinics; for salaries and supplies for nursing homes; for shipping, storage, and security measures. Money was also spent on programs to monitor and visit vulnerable older people and to create associations for older Haitians.
Future plans: Over the next two years the group plans to spend remaining funds on efforts to monitor and protect elderly earthquake victims, and to improve older Haitians’ access to jobs and health care. Specific projects include cash-for-work and microfinance programs, accessible employment centers for older people, support for home-based care and nursing homes, and training for health-care professionals in geriatric care.

Hope for Haiti
Naples, Fla.
Amount raised: $5,900,000
Amount spent: $1,400,000
In-kind donations: $30,000,000
Where the money went: Before the earthquake, Hope for Haiti supported 37 schools and more than 60 health-care facilities. Cash donations have gone to remove rubble from facilities that were destroyed by the earthquake; provide tents, food, and other supplies to schools; begin construction of temporary facilities; and to work with the Ministry of Education to develop long-term reconstruction plans. Hope for Haiti has also provided volunteer medical care, worked with local organizations to provide water, transportation, and other services, and delivered more than $30-million worth of medicine, food, water, tents, and other supplies to more than 60 health-care sites, including a dozen camps for people left homeless by the earthquake.
Future plans: The charity plans to spend remaining funds over a three-year period, to complete reconstruction of its schools and health clinics; to expand the number of children attending its schools; to serve more people in an infirmary it runs; and to increase its ability to provide health care to people in Les Cayes, a city which has attracted 100,000 new residents since the earthquake.

Humane Society of the United States
Washington
Amount raised: $1,550,000
Amount spent: $400,000
In-kind donations: $10,000
Where the money went: For initial response and rescue work; for transportation and other assistance to veterinary and disaster-response experts who provided training to Haiti’s 60 veterinarians; for leasing a property that has provided veterinary care and training; for a training program in sterilizing and caring for street dogs; and for mobile veterinary care for Haiti’s street and draft animals.
Future plans: The remaining money will be spent over five years on veterinary training and outreach; spay and neuter efforts, vaccinations, and other veterinary care; equine-care workshops and training; developing a “veterinary response team” in Haiti; and opening and running a veterinary hospital and training center.

IMA World Health
New Windsor, Md.
Amount raised: $397,771
Amount spent: $331,087
In-kind donations: $325,977
Where the money went: To provide medicine and medical supplies ($136,098) and combat the cholera outbreak ($94,989 ), as well to support an economic-development program in the Artibonite region of Haiti ($100,000). The group also delivered $2.2-million worth of supplies.
Future plans: The charity will spend the remaining $66,684 to continue to provide medicine, medical supplies, and support to Haiti during the next six months.

International Medical Corps
Santa Monica, Calif.
Amount raised: $6,741,759
Amount spent: $4,065,032
In-kind donations: $16,222,493
Government grants: $7,525,116
Where the money went: For consultations with more than 156,000 patients; running 13 clinics; transporting 408 medical volunteers; training 287 Haitian health-care workers; educating more than 25,000 people; screening more than 20,000 children for malnutrition; constructing more than 275 latrines and 82 showers; distributing 3,959 family hygiene kits and 21,654 bars of soap; operating four cholera-treatment centers and opening three more; treating more than 3,575 patients at cholera centers; and educating 11,603 Haitians on cholera prevention.
Future plans: The remaining money will be spent over the next 18 months to two years on medical care, mental-health care, clean water, sanitation, and other services for people affected by the earthquake. The group will also expand cholera-treatment centers and the integration of clean-water and sanitation activities in camps for displaced people; help the government move more of its medical services outside of the country’s capital; educate local health professionals; and help vulnerable people better prepare for disasters.

International Relief & Development
Arlington, Va.
Amount raised: $345,000
Amount spent: $310,000
In-kind donations: $16,000,000
Government grants: $6,494,045
Where the money went: For emergency-shelter material for 28,000 people, tools, training, and construction materials to help 2,500 families build transitional shelter, and home-repair materials to 1,000 families. Built 226 latrines, 144 showers, and 35 hand-washing points, benefiting more than 8,000 individuals. Distributed seeds and tools and ran a cash-for-work program in Léogâne.

International Rescue Committee
New York
Amount raised: $13,100,000
Amount spent: $4,200,000
In-kind donations: $288,000
Government grants: $4,850,000
Where the money went: Reached an estimated 100,000 people through its health, water, and sanitation programs, which have focused on 30 settlements of earthquake survivors. Reunified more than 150 families and established 11 child-friendly spaces. In the field of women’s safety, the group has formed women’s groups in camps for displaced Haitians, improved camps so they are safer for women, given care to victims of sexual violence, and provided other kinds of aid. The nonprofit also manages two settlements for people left homeless by the earthquake, including training camp leaders, helping Haitians regain lost documentation (such as land titles and drivers’ licenses), and offers other assistance.
Future plans: Money will be spent on water, sanitation, and hygiene in schools, communities, and camps; on services that help children, including efforts to find long-term solutions for orphaned youngsters; on programs that help women, by continuing existing efforts and increasing job training for women; on an expansion of the charity’s efforts to help Haitians secure legal documentation, such as land titles; on economic development, including cash-for-work programs and longer-term efforts to revive the economy in Port-au-Prince, Petit Goâve, and other parts of Haiti.  

Islamic Relief USA
Alexandria, Va.
Amount raised: $2,527,914
Amount spent: $1,700,000
In-kind donations: $377,695
Where the money went: Of that money, $916,119 has been re-granted to a group called IRQ for shelters. Approximately $26,390 paid for school desks.
Future plans: The charity intends to build health-care clinics and schools in two camps near Port-au-Prince.

Lions Clubs International Foundation
Oak Brook, Ill.
Amount raised: $1,543,000; $6,100,000 worldwide
Amount spent: $1,800,000 worldwide
Where the money went: Meeting people’s immediate needs after the earthquake, as well as building 600 transitional homes for earthquake victims.
Future plans: Money will be spent over a minimum of four years on rebuilding homes, hospitals, and the country’s eye-care system.

Lutheran World Relief
Baltimore
Amount raised: $7,253,412
Amount spent: $4,242,276
Where the money went: Much of the money ($3.38-million) has been given to other charities: ACT (Action by Churches Together) Alliance and members, such as Lutheran World Federation, Norwegian Church Aid (NCA) and Christian Aid and the two local partners World Neighbors and Partnership for Local Development, as well as IMA World Health. Immediately after the disaster, the money went to distribute food, water, and other supplies.
Future plans: Lutheran World Relief plans to work with World Neighbors, Partnership for Local Development, and other groups on a five-year effort to strengthen community groups in Haiti. Goals include providing health and hygiene training, building latrines, supporting livestock programs, providing training to people in reducing the impact of natural disasters, teaching sustainable farming, providing small loans, building water-treatment facilities, and continuing to meet the basic needs of people left homeless by the earthquake.  

Medical Teams International
Tigard, Ore.
Amount raised: $4,940,000
Amount spent: $1,700,000
In-kind donations: $8,113,487
Where the money went: An estimated 250,000 people received medical care through medical supplies and other product donations. More than 24,000 received direct medical care from the charity’s workers. Some of the money was re-granted to other groups:  $131,216 to World Relief to aid 1,600 people with mental-health support and other assistance; $40,000 to Quisqueya Crisis Relief for support of volunteer medical professionals; $25,000 to Union of Evangelical Baptists of Haiti to rebuild a clinic and house for medical staff; $20,000 to TeacHaiti, for hygiene education for 250 children; another $20,000 to Christian Services International to immunize 5,000 children; $10,000 to Haiti Foundation of Hope, for supplies for a clinic; and $2,000 to Christian Reformed World Relief Committee for a new generator for a facility.
Future plans: Some money will be spent over the next year on fighting the cholera epidemic. The rest will be spent over the next three to four years to increase the capacity of hospitals and meet other longer-term needs.

Mennonite Central Committee
Akron, Pa.
Amount raised: $5,400,000; $14,000,000 worldwide
Amount spent: $3,600,000 worldwide
In-kind donations: $2,600,000
Where the money went: Most of the money has been committed to other groups: A dozen Haitian charities have received or are scheduled to receive grants, while six Canadian or U.S. groups will be receiving money. The money helped more than 20,000 people in Port-au-Prince with emergency needs after the earthquake; paid for the inspection of 660 buildings; built or repaired 516 houses; provided 1,000 water filters; provided cash transfers to more than 1,000 people; provided daily meals to 500 children for three months; employed 610 people in a cash-for-work program; and provided short-term work to another 68 people.
Future plans: Remaining funds will be spent over four years on shelter and housing, food security and livelihoods, education, human rights, emergency assistance, health, programs to help earthquake survivors heal from trauma, and other costs related to running programs and helping local groups.

Mercy Corps
Portland, Ore.
Amount raised: $16,770,756; $17,202,338 worldwide
Amount spent: $5,091,859
Government grants: $20,886,687
Where the money went: Reached an estimated 340,000 people in Port-au-Prince, Haiti’s Central Plateau, and Lower Artibonite Valley. More than 25,000 earthquake survivors in 25 camps in Port-au-Prince received water and sanitation services; more than 28,000 people were employed through clean-up and rebuilding projects; more than 30,000 people were reached with information on cholera prevention and treatment; more than 2,700 teachers and other adults were trained in mental-health care of children; 55 mentors were trained who provided sports programs to children; and people were educated about emergency preparedness and mental health through open-air cinema and television presentations.
Future plans: The charity will spend the remaining money  over two years on a variety of projects.

Operation Blessing International
Virginia Beach
Amount raised: $6,200,000
Amount spent: $4,300,000
In-kind donations: $185,000,000
Where the money went: Water, hygiene, and sanitation, including 38 water-purification systems that each have the capacity to purify 10,000 gallons of water a day and 1,000 LifeSaver water-filtration units for areas that lack clean water. The charity, in cooperation with Partners in Health, started Zanmi Beni Children’s Home, in Port-au-Prince, for disabled children abandoned by their parents. Construction of a community center in Camp Villa Betame. Operation Blessing made grants to Partners in Health ($340,000), St. Luc’s Family Hospital for a surgical facility ($100,000) and a cholera clinic ($50,000), Caribbean Harvest to expand a fishing hatchery and microenterprise program ($50,000), Haiti’s general hospital ($50,000), Mission Aviation Fellowship ($50,000), KT Foundation ($10,000), and Samaritan Air ($10,000).
Future plans: Over the next 12 to 18 months, the charity plans  to maintain and operate water-purification systems, install wells and permanent water-purification systems at major hospitals, expand Zanmi Beni and a fish-hatchery program, and house and feed medical volunteers, as well as support construction projects at St. Damien and St. Luc’s hospitals. Operation Blessing will manage production and pay for medical-grade oxygen for the general hospital for the next two years.

Operation USA
Los Angeles
Amount raised: $2,400,000
Amount spent: $1,300,000
In-kind donations: $5,500,000
Where the money went: Sent eight shipments of medicine, shelter supplies, and other materials by airplane and many more containers by sea. Provided medical personnel to assist other groups in Port-au-Prince and Jacmel; provided cash grants for food and shelter to other groups; relocated people affected by the earthquake and assisted them with housing; and created more than 125 jobs. The group also began construction of a primary school, which is to be completed early in 2011.
Future plans: The remaining funds will be spent on projects associated with the primary school, such as food programs, scholarships, and community-development efforts. Money will be spent over a minimum of two years.

Oxfam America
Boston
Amount raised: $29,000,000; $98,000,000 worldwide
Amount spent: $13,000,000; $68,000,000 worldwide
Where the money went: Helped an estimated 500,000 people during the initial response and an additional 315,000 as part of an effort to stop the spread of cholera. Of the total, $19.5-million went to water and sanitation; $10-million to hire and pay staff, most of whom are Haitian; $11-million to economic development; $8-million to logistics, transportation, and other such costs; $6.5-million for vehicles, office space, and related costs; $5-million for shelters and non-food items; $4-million to manage, evaluate, and run programs; and $3-million on efforts to reduce the risk of disasters, support advocacy, and related efforts.
Future plans: Money will be spent over the next two years to help vulnerable people, develop longer-term solutions to the country’s water and sanitation challenges, invest in small businesses, establish a center to aid the design and rebuilding of homes, encourage links between farmers and consumers, improve agriculture practices, help people adapt to climate change and reduce the risk of natural disasters, encourage local groups and leaders to participate in the rebuilding process, and advocate for an effective strategy toward rebuilding.

Pan American Development Foundation
Washington
Amount raised: $1,700,000
Amount spent: $1,700,000
In-kind donations: $2,700,000
Government grants: $7,900,000
Where the money went: Some went to local groups: Grants of up to $25,000 were made to charities working in relief, reconstruction, and human rights. Overall, the charity’s efforts reached an estimated 1.3 million people. It distributed more than 200 tons of supplies and also helped to repair and rebuild schools, support orphanages, and meet other needs.
Future plans: All the money raised for earthquake recovery has been spent, but the charity will continue to work in Haiti as it did before the disaster.

Partners in Health
Boston
Amount raised: $81,749,529
Amount spent: $25,407,399
In-kind donations: $2,559,899
Government grants: $1,768,147
Where the money went: Biggest expenditures include hospital care ($15.2-million); social and economic support services, such as training in farming techniques for 1,000 families ($4.9-million); medical services in four settlement camps ($3.4-million); and a medical-volunteer program ($1.4-million). Partners in Health also spent $60,000 on initial costs for a new, 320-bed teaching hospital in Mirebalais, which will be the country’s largest hospital outside of Port-au-Prince. The group has seen more than 149,940 patient visits in its four health clinics in camps for earthquake survivors alone.
Future plans: The group is running a three-year, $125-million fund-raising campaign to help rebuild and strengthen the country’s public health-care system. By June 2012, the organization plans to spend $95-million on improving clinic services and community-development programs in Haiti’s Central Plateau and Lower Artibonite (60 percent of the $95-million); on the new hospital (18 percent); on infrastructure related to the public-health system (6 percent); on medical care for people in camps (4 percent); and on other program expenses (12 percent).

Plan USA
Warwick, R.I.
Amount raised: $1,700,000; $41,000,000 worldwide
Amount spent: $18,000,000 worldwide
In-kind donations: $13,000,000
Government grants: $47,960
Where the money went: For hygiene kits, emergency tents and tarps, food, potable water, emergency shelter, building materials for schools, clinics, and other facilities, water infrastructure, vaccinations, school and art supplies, cash for cash-for-work programs, assistance to medical staff, and other efforts. Some of the money has been re-granted to other groups.
Future plans: Plan USA will continue its work in education, health, water and sanitation, disaster risk-reduction, and other areas.

Population Services International
Washington
Amount raised: $352,084
Amount spent: $295,262
Where the money went: For transporting health supplies to rural and vulnerable people, to supplement existing grants to fight AIDS and malaria, and to tackle other health challenges in Haiti.
Future plans: In light of the recent cholera outbreak, says the charity, the money will be spent on safe water and hygiene programs.

Project Hope/People-to-People Health Foundation
Millwood, Va.
Amount raised: $2,346,908
Amount spent: $1,437,782
In-kind donations: $56,948,797
Where the money went: For volunteer care for 1,000 patients aboard a navy treatment facility immediately following the disaster; for immediate care for 150 amputees; for assistance with three new buildings that will provide medical care; for care of cholera victims, including support of a team of cholera experts from Bangladesh; and for inventories of equipment at six hospitals and to improve the infrastructure of three.
Future plans: The money will be spent through 2012.

Relief International
Los Angeles
Amount raised: $596,667
Amount spent: $319,555
Government grants: $1,500,000
Where the money went: To support eight health clinics—five of which are mobile—which had treated 53,175 patients as of August 2010; to build 500 latrines in 58 camps for earthquake survivors, and to improve water and sanitation at three public-health clinics; to distribute shelter kits to 2,119 families; to operate women’s and children’s centers in four camps and 12 neighborhoods; and a cash-for-work program.
Future plans: The remaining money will be spent on livestock program to help victims of gender-based violence earn money; on a continued response to the cholera epidemic; on  establishing additional women’s and children’s centers; and on helping develop local leadership of the centers.

Salvation Army
Alexandria, Va.
Amount raised: $25,350,000; $28,950,000 worldwide
Amount spent: $12,430,000 worldwide
Where the money went: To pay for 6.9-million meals, 1.5-million gallons of water, 82,900 mosquito nets, treatment for 26,800 patients in clinics, 8,100 cots, 8,000 cleaning kits, 7,600 hygiene kits, 2,300 tents, and 606 transitional shelters. These figures are as of August 31, 2010.
Future plans: The charity intends to spend the remaining money over the next three to five years. Projects include: opening nine centers for children and teenagers ($1.3-million); helping families recover from trauma, find ways to earn money, and possibly receive permanent housing ($3-million to $6-million); rebuilding 12 schools and refurbishing another 30, and making them handicap accessible ($6-million); rebuilding a community center ($3-million); rebuilding a clinic ($1.75-million); community organizing and developing ($1.5-million); buying a new headquarters in Haiti ($1-million); providing temporary facilities for 1,500 students for one month ($192,000); providing emotional and spiritual support for women ($156,000); offering support for 300 vulnerable children ($200,000); and managing a camp for homeless people ($50,000).

Save the Children
Westport, Conn.
Amount raised: $30,184,533; $70,741,672 worldwide
Amount spent: $15,011,064
In-kind donations: $4,162,053
Government grants: $13,003,804
Where the money went: To programs in the fields of education, shelter, water and sanitation, economic recovery, nutrition, health, and protecting children. The group says it has enrolled 41,000 children in temporary schools; provided tarps and other shelter to more than 31,200 households; reached more than 347,000 earthquake survivors in camps with toilets, clean water, and other hygiene needs; helped more than 100,000 people with cash-for-work programs and other economic aid; helped more than 230,680 women and children through nutrition programs; established or rehabilitated more than 80 health facilities and mobile clinics; registered more than 10,000 children in child-friendly play spaces; trained more than 900 adults to care for children; and provided other kinds of assistance in these areas.
Future plans: The remaining funds will be spent over five years, with a focus on rebuilding schools, rehabilitating health facilities, establishing committees to protect vulnerable children, helping schools and health facilities provide clean water and sanitation, and providing economic assistance and training to Haitians.  

Unitarian Universalist Service Committee
Cambridge, Mass.
Amount raised: $1,941,319
Amount spent: $494,001
Where the money went: Primarily to local groups. It supported ActionAid in providing relief supplies to earthquake survivors; Aprosifa, to provide physical- and mental-health services; the Association for Haitian Physicians Abroad, for medical care; Beyond Borders, to help keep children safe and to try to reduce child slavery; the Commission of Women Victims for Victims, to protect women from violence and prevent orphaned girls from going into prostitution; International Relief Teams, to provide supplies to hospitals; Konbit Fanm SAJ (Wise Women's Working Group), to help women become economically independent; Lambi Fund and Papaye Peasant Movement, for emergency water, food, shelter, and medical care; and Partnership for Local Development/Groundswell, to provide temporary employment and other aid to people affected by the earthquake.
Future plans: The money will be spent over a minimum of two years. Among the planned projects: a camp for 40 girls who were orphaned by the earthquake; a rural “ecovillage” for 40 families who lost their homes and want to work in sustainable agriculture; renewable-energy projects; an effort to train 80 Haitians in how to treat trauma; and a “develop a chef” effort that will train female street vendors in cooking.

United Methodist Committee on Relief
New York
Amount raised: $43,129,801
Amount spent: $3,586,168
Where the money went: Much has been re-granted to other groups, including Eglise Methodiste d’Haiti ($627,513), GlobalMedic ($20,000),Global Health Action ($96,175), ACT Alliance ($50,000), Church World Service ($30,000).  Florida Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church ($91,257), Haitian Artisans for Peace International ($20,000), and International Child Care/Grace Children’s Hospital ($297,000). It has supported the distribution of food and clean water; the re-establishment of a charity office in Port-au-Prince and of a task force to manage grants; the distribution of more than 24,000 health kits; 41 tents as temporary schools; medical care at a children’s hospital; health care, training, and cholera prevention efforts; support to medical evacuees in the United States; microcredit training for 85 women; 41 jobs removing rubble; emergency agriculture assistance; a university scholarship program for 33 students; development of a volunteer program, and other assistance.
Future plans: The money will be spent over next five to 10 years. Most will be spent on education, health, livelihoods, shelter, infrastructure, and community-development projects. Programs will be run directly by the charity as well as by local groups. Some money will be saved for future emergencies, such as another disease outbreak.

United Nations Foundation
Washington
Amount raised: $3,900,000
Amount spent: $3,400,000
Where the money went: $2.4 million to the United Nations’ Central Emergency Response Fund to provide emergency food, medicine, water, and shelter immediately following the earthquake; $240,000 to the United Nations Development Program for its cash-for-work project; and more than $776,000 to the United Nations Population Fund for maternal health kits and solar street lights to help keep women safe at night.
Future plans: Remaining money will go to the United Nations’ Central Emergency Response Fund.

United States Fund for Unicef
New York
Amount raised: $72,422,120; $299,567,982 worldwide
Amount spent: $112,000,000 worldwide
In-kind donations: $487,041
Where the money went: To Unicef, the United Nations agency. As of September 2010, the organization had reached 720,000 children and 15,000 teachers through a “back to school” effort; given second-round emergency immunizations to more than 1 million young people; provided recreational activities and safe play spaces to more than 80,300 children; and provided safe water (for example, 182,000 people are receiving 6.5 liters per day through emergency services).
Future plans: The charity’s focus is on rebuilding and improving communities so earthquake victims can return home; providing relief services to needy people; preparing for future disasters; enabling communities to provide better care for children; and responding to the cholera epidemic.

United Way Worldwide
Alexandria, Va.
Amount raised: $2,289,423; $3,861,538 worldwide
Amount spent: $726,375
Where the money went: For efforts to help Haitian refugees and evacuees in the United States, as well as work to rebuild schools. Longer-term efforts will also focus on reconstructing Haiti’s education system.
Future plans: The charity will support long-term recovery efforts.

University of Miami
Coral Gables, Fla.
Amount raised: $5,993,975
Amount spent: $5,043,581
In-kind donations: $925,450
Where the money went: The university’s hospital has provided emergency care to more than 30,000 people, performed 1,300 surgeries, and admitted more than 1,500 people for more than 48 hours. It has transported more than 3,200 volunteer doctors and other medical professionals to Haiti.
Future plans: The organization plans to improve its ability to treat patients affected by the earthquake and cholera epidemic. It will also help a maternal health center and residence in Haiti’s Central Plateau and assist the university’s students who were affected by the earthquake.

William J. Clinton Foundation
Little Rock, Ark.
Amount raised: $16,400,000
Amount spent: $11,500,000
In-kind donations: $16,000,000
Where the money went: A portion ($3.75-million) went to 14 charities or United Nations agencies, including Concern Worldwide USA, Partners in Health, and Oxfam, to help them meet a variety of needs. The organization committed $1.5-million to fighting the cholera epidemic; $1-million for the construction of hurricane shelters; and $1-million to help the Interim Haiti Recovery Commission, which is helping to oversee earthquake recovery.
Future plans: The remaining money will be used to meet pressing needs. Independent of the donations it raised after the earthquake, the foundation is supporting small- and medium-size business in Haiti through a $20-million fund created along with the philanthropists Frank Giustra and Carlos Slim.

World Food Program USA
Washington
Amount raised: $18,362,722
Amount spent: $18,262,274
In-kind donations: $502,200
Where the money went: To the United Nations World Food Programme, which provides food and help with logistics. The agency provided food to about 4 million people during the initial response to the earthquake. Now it is also assisting with cash-for-work programs, education, school meal programs, and other forms of aid.
Future plans: All money was scheduled to be spent by the end of 2010.

World Vision
Federal Way, Wash.
Amount raised: $44,000,000; $122,000,000 worldwide
Amount spent: $48,000,000 worldwide
In-kind donations: $32,000,000
Where the money went: Biggest costs were food ($34.6-million has been committed); shelter ($22.4-million); grants to local groups ($17-million); salaries, offices, and other operational costs ($11.1-million); water and sanitation ($7.3-million); health ($4.6-million); and safety ($2.4-million). Money also went to disaster mitigation, education, advocacy, and evaluation of programs.
Future plans: The remaining money will be spent on response efforts through 2013. Biggest priorities include: livelihoods and economic development, education and training, child safety and care, maternal and child health, shelter, reducing the impact of natural disasters, and advocacy for children and their safety.  

Yéle Haiti Foundation
New York
Amount raised: $13,909,900
Amount spent: $6,134,900
Where the money went: For emergency relief, employment programs, tree planting and agriculture, and youth development and education.
Future plans: The charity intends to continue its existing programs, and to create a school in Haiti and a scholarship program that will enable Haitian youths to attend boarding schools in the United States.

 

By Caroline Preston and Nicole Wallace

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