Arts Tumult in Philadelphia for Dance and Theater Groups

The Pennsylvania Ballet dismissed its veteran lead dancers this week, also letting go its marketing chief, the head of its ballet school, and other top officials, according to The Philadelphia Inquirer. The housecleaning comes a week after Angel Corella took over as artistic director and continues a remaking begun last year after an evaluation of the Philadelphia troupe’s operations by leading arts consultant Michael Kaiser.

Ballet master Jeffrey Gribler and ballet mistress Tamara Hadley both jo…

Foundation Tie Costs Frank Lloyd Wright School Accreditation

A decision by the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation not to spin off its affiliated architecture college into an independent entity means the institution will lose its accreditation, fomenting tension between the two groups, writes The New York Times.

The college’s board of governors criticized the foundation board’s vote to retain control of the college at the cost of its blessing from the Higher Learning Commission, which adopted a rule two years ago requiring institutions with its imprimatur to be…

Doctors Without Borders Stretched Thin by Ebola Crisis

Global medical relief group Doctors Without Borders said this week that it can provide only limited help to tackle a new outbreak of Ebola virus in the Democratic Republic of Congo as it is already strained by the epidemic in West Africa, Reuters reports. The charity will send doctors, nurses, and logistics experts to the country but not specialist Ebola teams, as it would normally do in response to an outbreak.

The central African nation announced on Sunday that a high number of suspected Ebola…

Grocery Chain Donates Ice Profits to Nerve-Disease Group

With the ice-bucket challenge taking off in Britain, U.K. supermarket chain Tesco said Wednesday it is giving profits from fast-rising ice-cube sales to charity and called on its corporate peers to do the same, writes the Press Association. The firm said it has donated more than $33,000 so far to the Motor Neurone Disease Association, which fights neurological disorders like ALS.

In line with individual participants in the viral charity phenomenon, who challenge others to douse themselves with i…

Rice, Not Ice, in Indian Version of Charity Bucket Challenge

A journalist in India has launched a “rice-bucket challenge,” encouraging people by social media to donate a bucket of the staple food to alleviate hunger, NPR reports. Since Manju Kalanidhi kicked off the effort Friday, posting a photo of herself giving 50 pounds of rice to a neighbor in the Indian city of Hyderabad, the campaign spread beyond the country’s borders, garnering 40,000 likes on a dedicated Facebook page.

A third of India’s 1.2 billion people live on less than $1.25 a day—and mor…

Banker’s $100-Million Museum Sows Discord in Spanish Town

A $106-million museum being built by the head of Santander, Spain’s largest bank, is lifting economic expectations in the seaside city of the same name but also drawing criticism and legal challenges over its location on prime, publicly owned waterfront land, writes The New York Times. Designed by Renzo Piano and set to open next year, the Centro Botín represents the largest private cultural investment in the country.

The center is being fully funded by the foundation of Emilio Botín III, the t…

Opinion: Canadian Charity Politics Isn’t the Problem—Tax Benefit Is

The solution to the controversy over the Canadian tax agency’s audits of politicking by nonprofits is not to limit such activity but to get rid of charities’ tax breaks, a columnist for Canada’s daily National Post writes.

Canadian law limits charities to spending 10 percent of their resources on policy advocacy and bars them from outright partisan activity. The Conservative government has earmarked extra funds in recent years to beef up “political-activities audits,” which critics claim have be…

Moody’s Sees More Fiscal Struggle for Nonprofit Hospitals

Nonprofit hospitals had their worst financial showing since the Great Recession last year as expenses rose at a faster clip than revenues, The New York Times writes, citing a new report from Moody’s Investors Service. Hospitals revenues increased by 3.9 percent, compared to 7 percent or more in recent years, according to the credit-rating agency, which analyzed 383 health systems’ 2013 results.

Nonprofit medical centers’ costs have risen at a greater rate than income for the past two years as th…

Harvard Alumni Protest Big Pay Hike for Endowment Managers

A group of Harvard graduates has sent a letter to university President Drew Faust criticizing a huge jump in compensation for managers of the institution’s investment portfolio, Bloomberg reports. Salaries, benefits, and bonuses at the Harvard Management Company, the internal unit that oversees the university’s $32.7-billion endowment, rose from $63.5-million in 2010 to $132.8-million last year, according to tax filings.

The nine signatories, members of the class of 1969 who have previously crit…

S.C. University Wants Foundation to Pay for President Search

Winthrop University trustees will seek to have the Rock Hill, S.C., school’s nonprofit fundraising arm to cover the cost of finding a new campus president, The Herald of Rock Hill writes. The board voted unanimously on Monday to enter talks with the Winthrop University Foundation about footing the bill for the search, which could cost up to $150,000.

Jamie Comstock Williamson, hired as Winthrop’s president in February 2013 after a university-funded search, was fired less than a year after taking…